Camelot (2004)

Camelot (2004) Poster

Production Details

Synopsis

Lerner and Loewe’s majestic Camelot brings the legend of King Arthur and his Knights of the Round Table to life with an extraordinary score and a story that poignantly dramatizes the human conflict at the heart of this classic tale. Based on T.H. White’s novel, The Once and Future King, Camelot tells the story of Arthur, a young squire who becomes King after extracting the sword Excalibur from its legendary rock. Camelot opens in the midst of the battle that destroyed King Arthur’s kingdom, and goes back to tell the story of how the battle came to be.

The musical follows Arthur from a young, ambitious, idealistic King who dreams of creating a just society to the despairing king bearing witness to his dream’s demise. Arthur’s dream is inspired by his vivacious Queen Guenevere. Together, they create a kingdom where might works at the service of right and the King serves at a round table with no head — a symbol of collaboration and unity. But just as this utopian vision starts to become reality, everything begins to unravel. When Guenevere falls in love with Arthur’s most celebrated, beloved, and loyal knight, Lancelot, they begin a romance as doomed as it is passionate. Their troubles are compounded when Arthur’s illegitimate son, Mordred, arrives on the scene. In a world of human realities, can Camelot achieve the utopia of which Arthur dreams?

Cast

Principals
  • King Arthur – Anthony Smith
  • Guenevere – Delia McNally
  • Merlin – Alan Ball
  • Mordred – David Bruce
  • Pellinore – Olly Burton
  • Lancelor du Lac – Clark Adamson
  • Dap – Jamie Smith
  • Morgan le Fey – Valenda Taylor
  • Lady Anne – Deborah Summer
  • Lady Sybil – Lucy Wright
  • Sir Dinadan – Peter Hook
  • Sir Lionel – Ashley Frieze
  • Sir Sagramore – David O’Donnell
  • Sir Clarius – Mike Dixon
  • Nimue, sung by – June Laven
  • Nimue, danced by – Anouska Drion
  • Tom Malory – Thomas Fardoe
  • Scottish Knights – Tony Harries & Jonathan Taylor
  • Pages – Thomas Fardoe, Stephen Garbutt, Harry Lindsey, Shaun McMillan, Christopher Smith & Fergus Watson
  • Horrid, the dog – Jenson
Lords and Ladies of Camelot

Alan Ball, Ruth Ball, Alison Banks, Caroline Banks, Denise Beckford, Sophie Begg, Tim Bittlestone, Peter Bradshaw, Liz Cairns, Liz Clapham, Peter Clapham, Bryony Cooper, Rowena Cooper, Doreen Cothay, John Cuckson, Philip Dalton, Anthony Dixon, Janet Dixon, Christine Dobbie, Anouska Drion, Catherine Finn, Becky Fisher, Rob Gair, Tony Gardiner, Jonathan Gilderoy, Margret Graham, Barbara Gray, Katy Haggart, Rosie Hannis, Bill Harland, Helen Harries, Tony Harries, Nikki Hellmuth, Andrew Howard, Mollie Hughes, Dennis Lavin, June Lavin, Catherine Lawes, Guy Lawes, Heather McLoughlin, Stephanie Morton, Sherida Murphey, Robin Murray, Derek Smith, Jonathan Taylor, Deirdre Tyrrell, Ann Underwood, Robert Vallance, Pat Walker, Katy Watson, Chris Wood

Programme

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Reviews

Northern Noda News – August 2004

An open stage with Excalibur rising from the stone set the scene for this excellent production.

Seldom does a company so capture the mood, magic, and mystery of a piece, drawing the audience into the story.

Anthony Smith was cast in the demanding role of King Arthur, successfully bringing out the various moods of the character, especially the tender moments, as in ‘How To Handle a Woman”.

Delia McNally was Queen Guenevere, torn between her love for Lancelot and her duty as a wife to the King. She sang beautifully, and looked every inch a Queen in her many beautiful costumes.

Clark Adamson, the arrogant Lancelot, captured the audience with a brilliant “C’est Moi!”.

This group is fortunate in having experienced members to play supporting roles, such as Valenda Taylor (Morgan le Fey), David Bruce (Mordred) Alan Ball (Merlin), and especially Olly Burton, a wonderful Pellinore.

Mention must also be made of the “Follow Me” number, beautifully sung by June Lavin, and danced perfectly by Anouska Drion. This evening was a spectacular success, enjoyed by everyone in the audience.